Barefoot Good Samaritan Saves Woman from Sexual Assault, Robbery - The Chicago Criminal Law Blog

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Barefoot Good Samaritan Saves Woman from Sexual Assault, Robbery

On Saturday morning, Ron Psenka heard a woman being assaulted outside his Lincoln Square home. After telling his wife to call 911, he ran outside barefoot and chased the woman’s assailant down the street with a shovel, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Psenka was eventually able to flag down officers to make the arrest. Admon Shasho, the alleged attacker, is currently being held on aggravated criminal sexual assault and attempted robbery charges.

Shasho, a cab driver, saw the 21-year-old woman walking on Lincoln Avenue while listening to her iPod, according to prosecutors. He allegedly followed her to an alley where he grabbed her from behind, placed his hand over her mouth, and told her not to scream or he’d kill her. He then reportedly took the woman’s purse and phone, dragged her to the ground, removed her cloths and began to sexually assault her.

Psenka overheard the woman’s screams, and darted out of his house without his shoes. “I immediately got up and grabbed a shovel and chased him about three and half blocks in my bare feet,” Psenka said. After Psenka flagged down police, the officers brought Shasho to the woman who verified that he was her attacker.

Good Samaritan laws provide immunity from liability to a person who, in trying to offer help or aid to someone, causes injury due to the negligent administration of the help. Illinois’ Good Samaritan Act protects Good Samaritans from liability in a number of situations, including offering emergency telephone instructions, providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and performing the Heimlich maneuver on someone who’s choking.

In nearly all situations, the Good Samaritan must be qualified to perform the services in order to be protected from liability. For instance, in order to be protected from liability for injuries incurred while performing CPR, the Good Samaritan must be trained in CPR. None of the Illinois Act’s provisions cover Psenka’s particular brand of aid, but luckily no one was injured as a result of Psenka’s help.

The woman has since visited Ron Psenka and his wife to thank the couple for saving her from Admon Shasho’s alleged attack. “That poor woman was being assaulted in the alley and needed my help, that was my goal,” Psenka said of his actions.

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