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Coal City Man Sentenced To 50 Years For Child Porn

The Coal City Courant reported that Timothy T. Scholtes was sentenced to 50 years in a federal prison for receiving and manufacturing child pornography. The 46-year-old former youth soccer coach denies any wrongdoing despite pleading guilty to the charges.

Through his Illinois criminal defense attorney, Timothy Scholtes has stated his intention to appeal the sentence.

Timothy Scholtes not only was convicted on charges related to child pornography, but also was proven by federal prosecutors to have molested at least six boys under the age of 12. They also proved that he had planned or attempted to molest other children.

He originally was arrested in June 2009 for indecent solicitation of a child. Agents searched his house and found a computer registered to him containing more than 200 images and 30 video files of pre-pubescent boys and girls engaging in sexual acts with adults and other children.

Agents also found documents with stories about men having sex with children. One story in particular, written by Timothy Scholtes, was about a soccer coach and three of his young players at a pool party. In fact, he had scheduled a pool party with his team just days before his arrest.

In addition, agents found printed photographs of a 10-year-old boy's genitals, which was the basis for the manufacturing of child pornography charge. That single charge made up 30 years of his 50-year sentence. The boy in that photograph was repeatedly molested by Timothy Scholtes over several years, according to prosecutors.

All but one of roughly 12 boys interviewed by police said he inappropriately touched or propositioned them. A clinical psychologist who examined him said the following:

"[He] exhibits a remarkable lack of empathy, lack of remorse, poor behavioral controls and failure to accept responsibility for his actions."

He must serve at least 85 percent of his sentence, which means he'll be 88 before he is eligible for parole.

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